Health promotion plan on teenage pregnancy

Health promotion plan on teenage pregnancy
Practicing in the Community to Improve Population Health
Instructor
December 2021
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Introduction
In other to improve the health of a particular group or community, a health promotion plan must be developed. By allowing people and communities to exercise greater control over their health status determinants through healthcare promotion, it is feasible to enhance health status. Implementing a health promotion plan may benefit nations, governments, communities, families, and people; it enhances their quality of life (Barker et al., 2018).
This health promotion plan essay’s focus is on teen pregnancy. I will be analyzing teen pregnancy, the importance of preventing teen pregnancy, interventions to prevent teen pregnancy, and the importance of establishing agreed-upon health goals with teenagers in the community.
Because of the hazards to both mother and unborn child, teen pregnancies are characterized as a source of increased mortality and morbidity. Health promotion measures should be designed and executed to reduce the number of adolescent pregnancies and complications that come with it.
Pregnancies during youth are widely perceived as barriers to a young woman’s capacity to complete her education and obtain employment later in life. Adolescent attitudes on teenage pregnancy may differ based on their socioeconomic status. Adolescent mothers’ obstetric outcomes can be considerably improved by an excellent social welfare system that includes proper prenatal care and psychological support.
 
 
Teen pregnancy analysis
Concerns about teen pregnancy and motherhood are becoming more widespread across the world. More adolescent pregnancies occur in marginalized groups worldwide because of poverty and a lack of educational and career opportunities. From a historical viewpoint, teen pregnancies are nothing new. Girls married in their late teens and gave birth to their first child in their early twenties during much of human history. This kind of sexual behavior was considered normal and socially acceptable. Preventing teenage pregnancies and adolescent motherhood has become essential for public health in developed and developing countries (McElroy & Moore, 2018). Pregnancies among teens have traditionally been associated with substantial medical difficulties; however, most data supporting this idea was acquired decades ago and reflected the situations of young women who were already socially disadvantaged. According to studies undertaken in recent years, adolescent pregnancies are not necessarily harmful. According to studies undertaken in recent years, adolescent pregnancies are not necessarily harmful. Teenage mothers under age 15 are a clear risk group. They face several medical risks, such as preeclampsia, premature labor, and tiny gestational age newborns. Also, they face some social disadvantages as poverty, unemployment, low educational level, and single parenting (McElroy & Moore, 2018). A range of factors impacts adolescent pregnancy and delivery. Women are encouraged to marry and have children at a young age in many cultures. In the world’s least developed countries, at least 39 percent of females and 12 percent of boys marry before 18. Many young women desire to become pregnant since their educational and employment possibilities are restricted. Marriage or union and childbirth may be the finest of the few possibilities since motherhood is valued in some societies (“Adolescence pregnancy,” 2020).
Teenagers’ ability to avoid conception may be hampered by a lack of understanding and disinformation about where and how to get contraceptive methods. Teens face challenges while attempting to get contraception due to health care practitioners’ inability to embrace the particular needs of teenagers in terms of sexual health and a lack of education, transportation, and financial means. Adolescents sometimes lack the power or duty to independently make decisions about contraceptive devices’ correct and regular use. Every year, at least 10 million adolescent pregnancies occur among 15 to 19-year-olds in developing nations. Every year, around 21 million girls between the ages of 15 and 19 get pregnant in developing nations, with an estimated 12 million giving birth. Every year, at least 777,000 young women under 15 give birth in developing countries (“Adolescence pregnancy,” 2020).
Why preventing teenage pregnancy is essential for health promotion.
Adolescent pregnancy is a public health issue that impacts the mother, the infant, and the community, making it essential for health promotion. Childbearing and pregnancy problems are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among teenagers aged 15 to 19. It is necessary to implement health promotion efforts to address adolescent pregnancy and complications, thereby reducing the great majority of problems associated with teenage pregnancy (McElroy& Moore, 2018).
The risks and realities of becoming a teenage mother have been extensively chronicled. The consequences can be felt long after the kid is born and throughout the woman’s life. Children are more likely to be born prematurely, with lower birth weight and a higher mortality rate. At the same time, mothers are more likely to suffer from post-partum depression and are less likely to start breastfeeding. Most children delivered to adolescent mothers have health and developmental problems, and the mothers are less likely to finish high school. If risk factors for pregnancy are better recognized, teen pregnancy rates can be minimized (McElroy & Moore, 2018). Childhood trauma, a family history of adolescent pregnancy, behavioral and attention disorders, family instability, and low educational achievement all contribute to the chance of adolescent pregnancy.
Interventions to prevent/reduce teenage pregnancy
A range of interventions can be taken to avoid adolescent pregnancy. Creating evidence-based programs such as education and counseling on health education and contraceptive use is the first step in preventing teen/adolescent pregnancy. As a result, these evidence-based interventions will need to be implemented by a community or state-based teen-serving organization. The second aspect is to enhance the availability and distribution of effective contraceptives among sexually active teenagers. To increase the application of scientifically established approaches for the treatment of adolescents in reproductive health, local health institutions and government organizations must collaborate (McElroy & Moore, 2018). So far, the usage of highly effective contraception and high levels of customer satisfaction have been connected to the execution of these techniques. The importance of including and inspiring the community, including adolescence, in all aspects of a project, including planning, execution, and evaluation, cannot be overstated, as it empowers and enables individuals to make the best decision possible related to their wellbeing.
 
 
Importance of establishing agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with teenagers/adolescent
It is vital to collaborate with teenagers in the communities and establish goals to prevent teenage pregnancies. According to (“Preventing teen pregnancy,” 2019), “more teenagers more than 43% of teenagers have had sex, 86% of them are using some form of contraceptives, and less than 5% uses a less effective birth control method”. Therefore, as nurses serving the communities, it is crucial to know their knowledge about different types of contraceptives and provide information about the most effective ones and how to access them. Healthcare providers can also provide and offer more choices of contraceptives. Also, during a collaboration with teenagers in the community, the healthcare provider may use this to raise an awareness that using birth control of any form may prevent pregnancy. However, it would not prevent exposure to sexually transmitted diseases and infections.
Conclusion
Because of the high mortality and morbidity rates associated with teen pregnancy, a health promotion approach is essential for combating these issues. Young women’s pregnancy has been linked to some social and economic difficulties. Teenage mothers are frequently looked down upon by their parents and partners. It is difficult for young women to return to school after giving birth to their first child, negatively impacting them. The community, healthcare organizations, and adolescents must cooperate (McElroy & Moore, 2018). Such campaigns aim to educate community members and enhance the availability and usage of safe contraception for teenagers to prevent adolescent births.
 
References
Adolescent pregnancy. (2020, January 31). WHO | World Health Organization. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/adolescent-pregnancy
Barker, M., Dombrowski, S. U., Colbourn, T., Fall, C. H., Kriznik, N. M., Lawrence, W. T., Norris, S. A., Ngaiza, G., Patel, D., Skordis-Worrall, J., Sniehotta, F. F., Steegers-Theunissen, R., Vogel, C., Woods-Townsend, K., & Stephenson, J. (2018). Intervention strategies to improve nutrition and health behaviours before conception. The Lancet, 391(10132), 1853-1864. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(18)30313-1
McElroy, S. W., & Moore, K. A. (2018). Trends over time in teenage pregnancy and childbearing: The critical changes. Kids Having Kids, 23-53. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429452635-2
Preventing teen pregnancy. (2019, December 26). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/larc/index.html
 
 
https://www.cdc.gov/teenpregnancy/practitioner-tools-resources/psba-gto-guide/pdf/chapters/psba_gto_step2_508tagged.pdf

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Health promotion plan on teen
age
 
pregnancy
 
Practicing in the Community to Improve Population Health
 
Instructor
 
December 2021
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
Health promotion plan on teenage pregnancy
Practicing in the Community to Improve Population Health
Instructor
December 2021